Group Therapy

All three groups together

All three groups together

Our club organised their first Reliability Ride for August from Dumfries across to Bridge of Dee, Loch Ken then Corsock. It was a bit later than the traditional time in Spring but enjoyable nonetheless and different from our usual club runs.

We divided into 3 groups – 15, 17 and 19mph average over 55 miles. It’s definitely different riding in a group to a set time. Unlike club runs you suddenly become aware of a collective goal driving the pedals around which everyone in your group is responsible for – MAKING YOUR TIME!

Group One looking rather pleased with themselves!

Group One looking rather pleased with themselves!

I rode in the 19 group and I never felt we were on top of our average speed…it seemed to constantly elude us. It certainly made for an interesting ride and I found us talking more tactics than we ever would on a normal Saturday. We tried through and off, someone at the front riding tempo and, for the final section, two guys at the front drilling it. We certainly sounded like the crossest cycling group in Scotland at times with some choice expletives especially along the Loch Ken section.

anxiety eased - we made our time

anxiety eased – we made our time

Unbeknownst to us at the time, our anxiety was nothing compared to the 17 group who suffered 4 or 5 flats. This would be enough to have you heaving your bike over a dyke but it didn’t puncture their resolve or their motivation and they arrived with 17.7 on their garmins…chapeau. They had the biggest group which can bring its own problems.

f*** another puncture!

f*** another flat!

Cool as cucumbers were the 15 group who we passed on the Loch Ken. They seemed to be gliding along unworried and well organised.

We finished the official part of the ride at Pringles Pub in Corsock – great grub and I discovered people more fond of cake than myself. I enjoyed the day and the way that your own efforts are part of a bigger purpose.

The Wild Hills

The biggest race in South West Scotland, The Wild Hills, organised by the TLI and Dumfries CC, takes place this Saturday 13th April – Now in its tenth year, The Clubman caught up with race organiser, Dave Moss for his thoughts on the event’s continuing success and some advice for staying in contention on the road. (This blog post will be updated with photos from the race after the 13th)

Wild Hills 1994 - Whisky in the bidons?

Wild Hills 2004 – Whisky in the bidons?

Clubman – How long have you been organising the Wild Hills race?

Dave Moss – Well the oldest file I can find is from 2004, so it’s being going at least that long( 9yrs). It seems we had sponsorship from Scottish Leader Whiskey that year ! 30 finishers. This year we have over 75 riders competing.

Sprint for the 1995 winner

Sprint for the 2005 winner

Clubman – Why do you think the race has become so popular with riders?

Dave Moss – I suppose it’s because it encourages participation from all ages and abilities. Perhaps it’s the chaotic organisation that prevents it being taken too seriously and helps maintain a friendly atmosphere! Another factor might be that word has gotten around that Moniaive is actually not in the back of beyond, but fairly easy to get to from Ayrshire and Glasgow. The fact that it’s one big circuit rather than laps ( so you have to keep going if dropped ) and the long downhill finish seems to make everyone forget the pain they endured to get there.

Some Dumfries CC riders all smiles at the start 2009

Some Dumfries CC riders all smiles at the start 2009

Clubman – What memories of the Wild Hills do you have from over the years?

Dave Moss – Having to ask the riders who won! The large number of riders for whom it’s been their first race is a special satisfaction. The fact that some of Scotland’s top amateur riders return year after year is another plus.

Climb out of Moniaive - dig in!

Climb out of Moniaive – dig in!

Descent down towards Carsphairn

Descent down towards Carsphairn

Clubman – What advice would you give to riders on the road?

Dave Moss – Well there’s three crucial things to keep in mind. Number 1 There’s no point in attacking on the first climb as you will need the bigger, power riders to help you on the next 16 miles. If you are intending to attack do it from Dalry. There you will need to build up a substantial gap on the series of climbs if you’re going to hold it on the final downhill/ flat run in.

Ready to attack on the climb out of Dalry?

Ready to attack on the climb out of Dalry?

Get to the top of Corriedo and then a 4 mile downhill back into Moniaive

Get to the top of Corriedoo and then a 4 mile downhill back into Moniaive

Dave Moss – Secondly  – If you get dropped from one of the first groups, don’t ride it like a time trial, recover so you will be ready to get on the back of a faster group when they catch you.

And finally never give up! The course splits the field and there’s always riders to catch or ones who catch you who can race to the finish, and the prizes are distributed randomly, you might get one for 50th place!
UPDATE – The Race
The 13th turned out to be a dry day with good conditions for the route. One or to little scrapes aside, the route was as challenging as ever. The scratch group caught forward groups in smart time and as in many past encounters, the decisive attacks came on the climb out of Dalry. Congratulations to all the riders for providing an excellent race day.
Below is a little video with some interviews and photos.
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‘The ides of March are come…’

Amidst all the training sessions and hard miles in freezing headwinds, our club members are currently gripped by a familiar angst about our Saturday club run. What has brought this debate to the fore?…could it be the time of year?

A couple of seasons ago we changed the structure of our Saturday club run. It used to be a mass start but now we have three start times for groups of differing abilities and aspirations. There was apparently a lot of unhappiness about the old structure; the club was getting bigger, people getting dropped and the need for safe passage out of town.

And now? unhappiness about the 3 group structure, the club getting bigger, people getting dropped…plus ca change as the saying goes.IMG_3719

There is something which fascinates me when people change a system. I see this, as I’m sure many do, in my work place on a regular basis. The logic is always the same. A change in system is designed to improve things. But when you change a system do you change human nature? Do we even consider human nature – our competitiveness? Our need to be part of something but also our need to express ourselves? Or our self interest?

Mostly our Forum reflects the negative aspects of the Club run debate. And on the road most guys have something to say about what’s wrong and how it could be improved. This for me is actually encouraging because it shows that our cyclists care about their Saturday run and that they want to preserve something, the thing that got them out on a bike in the first place.

Our weekend run is the very centre of our club. That’s why it stirs up so much passionate debate in our members. The best experiences I’ve had on a bike have been on those Saturdays, teasing one another or trying to crush your buddies on a hill, or those incredible and mysterious moments of riding in a group where everyone is quiet and the cycling is intense and purposeful.

I might add that having cycled with clubs abroad, the vibe is exactly the same – the anxieties are similar.

Yet most of all the agonising is part of the cycling calendar. Usually the debates are most intense at this time of year – March and early summer. Why? Because of the importance of the winter and the training that goes on. Cyclists are naturally anxious about their level of fitness and because we are all at different stages in the winter months it can be a bit confusing on the road. Some guys are already strong. As for me, I’ve been getting smashed every Saturday during the winter months.

Whatever the changes ahead in the club run, I’m sure that deep down, it won’t change our cycling natures! I’ve no doubt there’s guys have got me in their sights and believe me, I’ll be returning it with interest in the summer and when those little on-road competitions are over then we’ll ride some great miles, talking nonsense and sharing stories. Long live Saturday mornings!